What are the first signs of Listeria?



Called an “opportunistic pathogen,” Listeria is noted to cause an estimated 2,600 cases per year of severe invasive illness. Perhaps not surprisingly then, “foodborne illness caused by Listeria monocytogenes has raised significant public health concern in the United States, Europe, and other areas of the world.”

Listeria bacteria are found widely in the environment in soil, including in decaying vegetation and water, and may be part of the fecal flora of many mammals, including healthy human adults. According to the FDA, “studies suggest that 1-10% of humans may be intestinal carriers of Listeria.” Another authority notes that the “organism has been isolated from the stool of approximately 5% of healthy adults.” Overall, seasonal trends show a notable peak in total Listeria cases and related deaths from July through October.

Ingested by mouth, Listeria is among the most virulent foodborne pathogens, with up to 20% of clinical infections resulting in death. These bacteria primarily cause severe illness and death in persons with immature or compromised immune systems. Consequently, most healthy adults can be exposed to Listeria with little to any risk of infection and illness.

Except for the transmission of mother to fetus, human-to-human transmission of Listeria is not known to occur. Infection is caused almost exclusively by the ingestion of the bacteria, most often through the consumption of contaminated food. The most widely accepted estimate of foodborne transmission is 85-95% of all Listeria cases.

The infective dose—that is, the number of bacteria that must be ingested to cause illness—is not known. In an otherwise healthy person, an extremely large number of Listeria bacteria must be ingested to cause illness—estimated to be somewhere between 10–100 million viable bacteria (or colony forming units “CFU”) in healthy individuals, and only 0.1–10 million CFU in people at high risk of infection. Even with such a dose, a healthy individual will suffer only a fever, diarrhea, and related gastrointestinal symptoms.

The amount of time from infection to the onset of symptoms—typically referred to as the incubation period—can vary to a significant degree. Symptoms of Listeria infection can develop at any time from 2 to 70 days after eating contaminated food.

When a person is infected and develops symptoms of Listeria infection, the resulting illness is called listeriosis. Only a small percentage of persons who ingest Listeria fall ill or develop symptoms. For those who do develop symptoms because of their infection, the resulting illness is either mild or quite severe—sometimes referred to as a “bimodal distribution of severity.”

On the mild end of the spectrum, listeriosis usually consists of the sudden onset of fever, chills, severe headache, vomiting, and other influenza-type symptoms. Along these same lines, the CDC notes that infected individuals may develop fever, muscle aches, and sometimes gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea or diarrhea. When present, the diarrhea usually lasts 1-4 days (with 42 hours being average), with 12 bowel movements per day at its worst.

As already noted, when pregnant, women have a mildly impaired immune system that makes them susceptible to Listeria infection. If infected, the illness appears as an acute fever, muscle pain, backache, and headache. Illness usually occurs in the third trimester, which is when immunity is at its lowest. Infection during pregnancy can lead to premature labor, miscarriage, infection of the newborn, or even stillbirth. Twenty-two percent of such infections result in stillbirth or neonatal death.

Newborns may present clinically with early-onset (less than 7 days) or late-onset forms of infection (7 or more days). Those with the early-onset form are often diagnosed in the first 24 hours of life with sepsis (infection in the blood). Early-onset listeriosis is most often acquired through trans-placental transmission. Late-onset neonatal listeriosis is less common than the early-onset form. Clinical symptoms may be subtle and include irritability, fever, and poor feeding. The mode of acquisition of late onset listeriosis is poorly understood.

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