FDA Investigates Tomatoes as Source of Foodborne Illness in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Mid-Atlantic


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and several state health and agricultural agencies, is focusing on certain pre-sliced tomatoes as the likely source of Salmonellosis in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Since July 2, 2004, 289 cases of Salmonella have been reported in these states. Many appear to be related to pre-sliced Roma tomatoes purchased at deli counters in Sheetz Gas Stations between July 2nd through July 9th based on epidemiological investigation of the Salmonella cases.

Salmonella is an organism which causes serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems. Healthy persons infected with Salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In rare circumstances, infection with Salmonella can result in the organism getting into the bloodstream and producing more severe illnesses such as arterial infections (i.e. infected aneurysms), endocarditis, and arthritis.

FDA continues its close collaboration with the CDC, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, the Pennsylvania Department of Health, and other authorities to identify the source of the current outbreak of Salmonella and help prevent any further spread of these outbreaks.

Individuals who believe they may have experienced the same symptoms of illness after consuming sandwiches from this company are urged to contact their local health department.